The three chamomile essential oils, benefits and uses

All chamomiles look very similar to each other

All chamomiles look very similar to each other

Originally published on Guide to Aromatherapy

Chamomile essential oils come in three distinct types. German chamomile and Roman chamomile are those generally used in aromatherapy.

Maroc or Moroccan chamomile is also available, but this is said not to be a “true chamomile”, and has completely different properties, though they are all members of the same botanical family. If you are starting out in aromatherapy, you should probably buy either the German or Roman type.

Confusingly, both Moroccan and German chamomile are sometimes called wild chamomile, so as with remedial herbs, it’s best to check the latin name in this case and also¬†where the label just says “chamomile”.

As with all essential oils, none of the oils mentioned in this post should be taken internally, even though you may see this recommended elsewhere. Essential oils are highly concentrated and can cause permanent damage if used in this way, even if you think you have diluted them. Be safe and use them as intended, in massage blends and diffusers, and keep them out of the reach of children at all times.

So here’s a breakdown of the three types and their properties:

German chamomile essential oil is extracted from the flowers of Matricaria recutita (previously called Matricaria chamomilla or Chamomilla recutita). Most of the plants cultivated for extraction are grown in Hungary and eastern Europe, rather than in Germany.

It can be used for acne, allergies, arthritis, boils, burns, chilblains, dermatitis, earache, eczema, inflammation, inflammatory diseases, insomnia, menstrual problems, migraine, muscle pain, nervous tension, psoriasis, sprains, toothache and small wounds.

I offer German chamomile essential oil in my online shop.

Roman chamomile essential oil is an extract from the flowers of Chamaemelum nobile (previously called Anthemis nobilis). The plant can be found growing wild across Europe and North America, although it is native to southern and western Europe.

It is used for all the same purposes as German chamomile.

I offer Roman chamomile essential oil, Roman chamomile 5% essential oil and organic Roman chamomile essential oil in my online shop.

Moroccan chamomile essential oil is extracted from the flowering tops of Ormenis multicaulis (sometimes called Ormenis mixta or Anthemis mixta). Plants used for extraction mainly come from north west Africa and southern Spain.

It is used for amenorrhea (no periods), colic, colitis, dysmenorrhea (painful periods), headache, insomnia, irritability, liver congestion, menopause, migraine, sensitive skin, spleen congestion and sunburn.

Moroccan chamomile essential oil is not suitable for use during pregnancy or for children under 13 years of age, or by anyone trying for a baby.

As you can see, it’s not really worth buying both the German and Roman types, though you could add Moroccan chamomile essential oil if you wish to treat the conditions it is used for (if you can find a reliable source).


Lavender essential oil, benefits and uses 3

Originally published on Guide to Aromatherapy

Lavandin, Lavandula x intermedia

Lavandin, Lavandula x intermedia

I’ve already discussed the different types of lavender aromatherapy oil available in my first post in this little series, and in the second post I went into the uses of lavender aromatherapy oils on the skin. This post covers other uses.

As I already said, lavender is so incredibly versatile that it really should be included in everybody’s aromatherapy kit. Great for emergencies such as burns, it’s also useful for calming and relaxing both mind, body and doubtless spirit too (though there isn’t any way of proving the last of these)! This is not just a nebulous “oh it makes me feel good” thing I’m talking about. Lavender essential oil is well known for dealing with anxiety and mood swings, as well as nervous tension.

As with all essential oils, none of the lavender essential oils should be taken internally, even though you may see this recommended elsewhere. Essential oils are highly concentrated and can cause permanent damage if used in this way, even if you think you have diluted them. Be safe and use them as intended, in massage blends and diffusers, and keep them out of the reach of children at all times.

Looking at this in more detail, it helps to relieve symptoms of fear, including apprehension, negative thoughts, panic attacks, paranoia, post traumatic stress, stage fright and worry of all kinds. Since bed wetting is often caused by underlying anxiety it’s not surprising that lavender is often used to treat this, as well.

Lavender also helps to get strong emotions under control, such as hysteria, impatience and irritability. Its general relaxation properties make it useful for treating insomnia and an aid to restful sleep, also for exhaustion and overwork; on the physical side it can also help to soothe and relax stiff, swollen and painful joints.

Migraine is a very variable condition which seems to be caused by a narrowing of the arteries in the head, though the underlying reasons are still not definite. Lavender has been shown to help in many cases, and with a condition as debilitating as this, it’s definitely worth trying, though as causes seem to differ from person to person, it’s obviously not possible to guarantee it 100%. You can either use it in an oil burner, on a handkerchief or the pillow, or dab it neat direct onto the temples.

For most of the other conditions mentioned here, you can use your lavender aromatherapy oil either in an oil burner or electric diffuser or by adding drops to your bath. For a standard oil burner, I would recommend 5-6 drops of lavender essential oil, or a similar quantity added to your bath. Don’t forget that when using essential oils in the bath, it should be added after the bath is ready to get into, as otherwise all the fragrance will have dissipated before you get the opportunity to benefit by it.

Even though in most cases described here you wouldn’t be using lavender essential oil directly on the skin, it’s still important that you obtain 100% pure essential oil, as the therapeutic properties are not delivered by the fragrance alone, but by volatile components which come along with it. To get the benefit of real lavender essential oil, you have to use real lavender essential oil, not a man-made substitute that smells similar to it.

I offer true lavender essential oil and organic true lavender essential oil in my online shop.